Miriam WOODS

Female 1921 - Yes, date unknown


Personal Information

  • Name Miriam WOODS 
    Born 7 Aug 1921  Thurles , North Tipperary , Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died Yes, date unknown 
    Notes 
    • This memoir was included in a letter dated 29th July 1990 from Miriam Dudley of 'The Poplars,' Dovea, Thurles, Co. Tipperary to Peggy Kearney, a great niece of Captain Carden's, following the latter's visit to morning service in Kilfithmone Church. It is included here in full rather than placed in an appendix as is gives such a delightful description of Barnane in Captain Carden's time.


      A VISIT TO THE CHAPEL AT BARNANE IN 1928 Memories of a very small girl of Barnane Castle and Church
      One of the happiest memories of my very early childhood as a little girl was to go to the quaint little church adjoining Barnane Castle with my father and mother, Richard and Jane Woods, along with my sisters. Back in those days we travelled by horse and trap the five miles from our own house in Craigue to attend morning service. This we did in hail, rain, wind or snow! In very cold weather we'd have the comfort of a big wool rug as we sat close together.
      The Church was an adjacent building to the main castle itself which was built at the foot of Devil's Bit mountain in Barnane, Co. Tipperary. The large domain was encircled by a stone domain wall. We would drive through the wrought-iron entrance gates with surrounding railings leaving the cut stone gate lodge on our left and went our winding way up the front avenue with the portly oak and elm trees on either side to arrive at the Castle and adjoining church. The castle was a very fine and truly magnificent and lofty building set in such idyllic surroundings. From here one could view the countryside for miles around.
      The pebble covered carriage way immediately beside the castle had deep graded and sloped banks on either side - in early springtime these would be covered in beautiful clumps and masses of snowdrops and crocus - long banks of yellow and white on either side - daffodils came later - with tall trees waving in the winds at the top of the incline. The horse would be housed in one of the coach houses (with cobble stone yard) while we were at service. A great attraction for us as children was the large fountain in front of the main entrance to the castle. The church building had originally been used by the many residents of the Carden family as a Turkish Bath house - hence the large circular windows with two smaller ones with central swivel opening on each side to allow quick exit of steam!
      A door led to the castle quarters so no need for anyone to cross the courtyard in Turkish towelling!! There was a huge black stove in the centre aisle (in former times heated the water for the Turkish baths) and now used to heat the church - and very comfortable that was in the depth of winter.
      My parents made a point of being in good time for service and so we'd be seated in the pew with Mother and then Father on the outside. The last member of the Carden family to reside in the castle was Captain Andrew Carden, a well liked man who used crutches since active service in the 1914-18 war. He was a regular church attender. He would open the door leading from the castle to the Church and as children when we heard the sound of his crutches touching the aisle we immediately stood up as a mark of respect. My father was a great man for discipline and we loved him all the more for that and respected him and in turn had the warmth of his love for us.
      Church over we'd travel home sometimes continuing up past the church and gardens down the back avenue past another cut stone lodge at the end of the garden which housed a family employed on the estate. The walls of the garden were lined with red brick brought from Athey, Co. Kildare to Templemore station by rail and transported to the castle by horse and dray. The walls being facing south and brick lined afforded the opportunity to grow exotic fruits of all kinds under the care of dedicated gardeners. Likewise the walls of the Church were lined with the same type red brick. The glasshouses were extensive and stretched over a large area of the south facing walls. In autumn the different hues of the creepers on the building were a sight to behold.
      The last resident of the Carden family to reside in the castle was Captain Andrew Carden (mentioned before) - he was a bachelor and hence there was no heir to the estate or to actively look after the domain. He sold the castle and lands to a Mr. Walter Thompson and the place became very neglected. He sold off some of the roofing and the wall material. Some years later by fate of time and finally through burning and fire the castle and Barnane Church and all its beauty are now a ruin.
      A way of life has ended. Sadly it's good bye to Barnane Church but it is not good bye to my happy memories. Miriam Dudley (née Woods)

      I was born in 1921. I remember the Captain in residence in the Castle. I must have been 7 or 8 years at the time. My grandfather John Woods and his family including my father Richard Woods were evicted from their home in Barnane by Sir John Carden [a confusing remark], and came to live in Craigue, hence my father would have attended Barnane Church as a child from his Barnane home and continued to do so from his Craigue home. [The land on the other side of the road between the Killoskehane lodge and the Barnane east lodge is called Graigue, with a G, not a C. Craigue must be another place, farther away. A Woods MI at Barnane graveyard (see Appendix 7) refers to Graigue, Templemore.' The Barnane deeds show that in 1814 Thomas Woods and Richard Woods demised part of their lands at Barnane (one acre) to John Carden. There are several Woods graves in the Barnane graveyard.] The church services were open to all at Barnane and functioned as an ordinary C of I parish church. The Carden employees made up a large part of the congregation. Captain Andrew Carden must have been wounded in an earlier encounter than the 1914-18 war - my mistake [However AEC was told that his injury was the result of falling down the stairs at his club in Dublin].
    Person ID I2208  Kirkpatrick Family Archives
    Last Modified 6 Jun 2013 

    Father Richard WOODS, ,of Graigue ,Templemore, Tipperary,Ireland,   b. 1850, Templemore, Tipperary , Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Dec 1934, County Tipperary, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Mother Jane"Janie" WALL,   b. 1878, County Tipperary, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Oct 1970, County Tipperary, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years) 
    Married 16 May 1906  Nenagh, County Tipperary, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F651  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Edward John DUDLEY, ,of "The Poplars", Dovea, Thurles, Co. Tipperary,   b. 1919, Roscrea , County Tipperary, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 1949  Nenagh, County Tipperary, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Ref: Ireland, Civil Registration Marriages Index, 1845-1958
    Children 
     1. Living
     2. Living
     3. Edward J. DUDLEY,   b. 1954, Thurles , North Tipperary , Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1955, Thurles , North Tipperary , Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     4. Living
    Last Modified 6 Jun 2013 
    Family ID F653  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart




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